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The Bio-Ag News: Spring 2022

The Bio-Ag News Spring 2022

Welcome to our Spring 2022 Newsletter! If this is your first time please enjoy various articles written by the staff here at Bio-Ag Consultants & Distributors.  Every quarter we bring you new and exciting content about industry trends, agricultural events and more.  We always welcome comments from our readers and even provide ad space when available.  If you want to receive an emailed copy or paper copy please call our office and our call takers will be happy to put you on our mailing list!  For all other inquiries please click here:

 

SIGN ME UP!

 

Inside this issue:

  • From the President
  • Avian Influenza Information
  • Dates to remember
  • Recipe of the season: Baked Lentils with Cheese
  • Updated Delivery Minimum Qualifiers and Fees
  • Happy Reading!

READ ME!

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Biosecurity Tips

MINIMIZING BIOSECURITY RISKS

 

As we see reports of the highly pathogenic H5N1 we have tips for decreasing your biosecurity risk on your farm.

  • Have dedicated non-porous boots for your barn.
  • If visiting a different farm wear booties or disinfect boots before going back into your barn.
  • Have dedicated clothing (coveralls) for the barn.
  • Don’t wear your barn clothes or boots off your farm.
  • Personal hygiene – Wear gloves and wash hands after being in your barn.
  • Limit contact with feces.
  • Dedicate storage containers and equipment for feed and feces.
  • Dedicate a drop off area for deliveries.
  • Transportation vehicles should be clean, disinfected and if traveling between farms.
  • Proper storage and disposal of used consumable items.
  • Observing self-quarantine if highly contagious diseases are suspected.
  • Contact your veterinarian if you suspect an illness.

 

For poultry specific tips have a look at this announcement from Feather Board Command Centre https://www.fbcc.ca/file.aspx?id=624e56a9-eaca-4ca5-a8c5-9ea5f33b95d6 

 

 

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Winter Nutrition for Beef Cattle

Winter Nutrition for Beef Cattle


Heading into the colder months it is important to keep in mind the extra requirements for our livestock. Whether you are bale grazing or have the herd back in the barn, recognizing two main concepts will help ensure the animals make it through the winter with enough vitality for another successful year!

 

First, the cold temperatures require the animal to expend more energy to keep warm. Cows that live outside will require some form of wind break and will require more feed to keep warm.

 

Secondly, the feeding of stored feeds means fewer fresh nutrients from pasture. Stored feeds lose vitamins and some other nutrients continually all throughout storage.    

 

Body Condition

Learning how to assess the body condition of your animals can tune you into changes that may need to be made in the animal’s diet. Condition scoring is especially tricky in winter when animals have thick coats, you may need to get your hands on the animals to properly assess. The animal’s body condition before winter begins will determine the quality of feed required. Cows that are too thin will be required to gain weight during the winter to be able to deliver a healthy calf, provide sufficient amounts of milk and get bred again for the following year. The amount of feed and feed quality required to overwinter a thin cow is significantly higher than a cow in good condition.

 

Extra Mineral and Vitamin requirements

  • Supplying enough mineral is very important during winter.
  • Those who free choice mineral exclusively will notice mineral consumption will increase in the winter months! Usually, the same goes for Seaweed meal, especially towards the end of winter.
  • Continue to provide free choice salt as well

Water

  • Still very important in winter; drives consumption of feed
  • Need some way to keep it unfrozen
  • Will drink closer to required intake if warmed a little (not ice cold)
  • Cold water can slow digestion and cause issues especially if drink a lot at once

Digestibility in Forages

  • Higher digestibility means that ruminants can get more energy out of the hay
  • Being aware of strategies to make high quality forages is very important for “grass fed” animals
  • Having good digestibility in your forages makes it less likely that you need to supplement grains
  • Low digestibility and poor quality forages will result in weight loss
    • Monitor the herd for signs of energy deficiency such as:
      • Consistently distended rumens
      • Scruffy hair coat (different from long hair)
      • Rumination more than 60 chews
      • Spinal chill- hair standing up on back around shoulders

Molasses for extra energy

  • Consider supplementing molasses if more energy required
  • Molasses also helps with fiber digestibility

Cold Stress

  • During those extremely cold and windy days cows will need to increase their consumption of forage to stay warm
  • Make more feed available during these times and do not let them run out

Natural Detox

  • Autumn and fall bring on a natural detoxification process. Think of colds in humans!
  • Winter dysentery and pneumonia in the fall and early spring can be the result of the body not having the capability to deal with the expulsion of toxins
  • During spring and fall it is important to provide enough vitamins and binders (such as clays) to expel toxins successfully

Calving

  • 3-6 weeks before calving consider lead feeding higher quality forages in preparation for calving
    • An easy way to do this is to offer alfa-alfa forage as part of the ration
    • Make the change gradually over 1-2 weeks
  • Adequate energy is required to, not only grow a calf inside, but also make lots of milk for the calf once born
  • Adequate protein is required to make antibodies for high quality colostrum
  • Lactating cows consume 30-50% more so be ready to increase feed once the calves start coming
  • If cannot meet energy or protein requirements with forages then consider supplementing with grains and/or molasses.

Know your Forages!

  • Test forages ahead of time so you can manage for potential shortcomings
  • If continue grazing in winter, test the quality of the feed on that pasture to ensure you don’t run into an issue of extreme weight loss- often these pastures are very low quality
  • Pair lower quality forage with higher quality to ensure consistent nutrition throughout winter
  • Keep your high-quality hay to feed beginning 3-6 weeks prior to calving until back on pasture
  • Forages containing legumes will have higher protein than those with just grasses.
  • In general
    • Forages made early in the season will have high digestibility and lots of good energy (longest days of sunlight) so don’t wait until July to make all your forages
    • 2nd 3rd and 4th cuts will be higher in protein than 1st cuts
    • 4th cuts and even 3rd cuts that are made late in the season and/or had lots of rain during growth will have very little fiber and high amounts of insoluble protein and need to be slowed down with forages that contain more fiber.

As always, Bio-Ag is here to help you with all your nutrition inquiries and high-quality mineral and vitamin needs! We can test your forages and put together rations and mineral programs for your herd. Please don’t hesitate to contact us or myself directly at [email protected] Helping you ensure your animals are in the best health is our passion!

 

~Dr. Kathrine Stoeckli

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The Bio-Ag News: Fall 2021

The Bio-Ag News Fall 2021

Welcome to our Fall 2021 Newsletter! If this is your first time please enjoy various articles written by the staff here at Bio-Ag Consultants & Distributors.  Every quarter we bring you new and exciting content about industry trends, agricultural events and more.  We always welcome comments from our readers and even provide ad space when available.  If you want to receive an emailed copy or paper copy please call our office and our call takers will be happy to put you on our mailing list!  For all other inquiries please click here:

 

SIGN ME UP!

 

Inside this issue:

  • From the President
  • Ruth Knight: Reflections on the Joy of Farming
  • Kathrine's Korner: Mycotoxins
  • Product Specials
  • Dates to remember
  • Recipe of the season: Zucchini Fudge Cake

Happy Reading!

 

READ ME!

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The Bio-Ag News Spring 2021

The Bio-Ag News Summer 2021

Welcome to our Spring 2021 Newsletter! If this is your first time please enjoy various articles written by the staff here at Bio-Ag Consultants & Distributors.  Every quarter we bring you new and exciting content about industry trends, agricultural events and more.  We always welcome comments from our readers and even provide ad space when available.  If you want to receive an emailed copy or paper copy please call our office and our call takers will be happy to put you on our mailing list!  For all other inquiries please click here:

 

SIGN ME UP!

 

Inside this issue:

  • From the President
  • Guest Article: Ruth Knight - Phasing into the Spring Equinox
  • Product Specials
  • Dates to Remember
  • Bio-Ag Turns 40!
  • Bio-Ag's new Loyalty Program
  • Product Updates: Black Earth Re-Brand
  • Kathrine’s Korner: Spring Pasture Introduction for Livestock
  • Recipe of the Season: Maple Roasted Parsnips

Happy Reading!

 

READ ME!

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Ingredient #4 - Whole Oats

Whole Oats: Part of a Balanced Diet

 

Oats are a whole-grain that provide lasting energy to your dog, so she has lots of energy to chew her toys, romp through the snow, and wrestle with her friends.

 

There are many wonderful benefits of feeding oats to your dog.

 

FIBRE: Oats provide your dog with fibre, which is essential for gut health.

 

METHIONINE AND CYSTEINE:  Oats are high in methionine and cysteine. These amino acids are important for your dog’s heart health.

 

CARBOHYDRATES: Oats are an excellent source of carbohydrates and provide your dog with the energy to hike, swim, and play with her friends.

 

PROTEIN: Oats are also a great source of protein.
 

B VITAMINS: Oats are rich in B vitamins.
 

LINOLEIC ACID: Oats are full of linoleic acid. This is a type of omega-6 fatty acid that helps keep skin strong and healthy.

After reading this, you may be craving a bowl of healthy oatmeal for yourself. It’s great to know that this nutritious food has health benefits for you and your best friend too!

 


~Guest Contributor, Alyssa Foulkes

Alyssa is a local dog trainer based in Guelph, Ontario. 

 

Visit Norman's Naturals.com to order your bag today!
Subscription orders are now available!

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Ingredient #3 - Whole Peas

Whole Peas: The Health Benefits

 

Peas are a dependable source of plant protein and also contain vitamin K, manganese, fibre, and carbohydrates.

 

In well-balanced diets, pulses (that’s lentils, beans, peas, and chickpeas) are not harmful to dogs.

 

A couple of years ago, pulses got blamed for causing dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs. The media pointed the finger at pulses, while animal nutritionists shook their heads. The media was misinformed.

 

Here are 10 facts to help you understand that peas are not the enemy:

  1. Breeds with the highest prevalence of DCM include Dobermans, Boxers, Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, English Cocker Spaniels, and Portuguese Water Dogs.
  2. Your dog requires the amino acid, taurine, in their diet to maintain a healthy heart.
  3. Your dog can convert methionine and cysteine into taurine in their body.
  4. Your dog’s physiological need for taurine varies with their breed, age, and sex.
  5. Obesity and diabetes have been related to lower levels of taurine in dogs, so it’s very important to keep your dog at a healthy weight.
  6. Your dog’s food should be fortified with taurine and/or its precursors (methionine and cysteine.)
  7. Researchers have found a link between low blood taurine concentration and DCM in breeds such as Scottish Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Dalmatians, Boxers, Newfoundlands, Portuguese Water Dogs, English Setters, and Alaskan Malamutes. Providing these dogs with taurine improved their cardiac function.
  8. Animal nutritionists combine multiple ingredients to ensure that your dog receives a healthy and balanced diet.
  9. Pulses have been used in pet food for two decades to provide quality protein and fibre sources.
  10. Peas are a great source of fibre that can help control body weight.

Norman’s Naturals includes real chicken, barley, oats, and rice, so your dog gets the methionine, cysteine, and taurine she needs. We also include DL-methionine.

 

Your dog deserves quality nutrition. Our delicious Chicken and Rice blend is balanced, tasty, and sure to provide your dog with lasting energy.

 


~Guest Contributor, Alyssa Foulkes

Alyssa is a local dog trainer based in Guelph, Ontario. 

 

Visit Norman's Naturals.com to order your bag today!
Subscription orders are now available!

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Ingredient #2 - Brown Rice

 

BROWN RICE: Why Natural Whole Grains are Good for Dogs

 

Brown rice is a natural whole grain. It provides your dog with essential vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, and amino acids. It is also a great source of fibre.

 

There are so many benefits to including brown rice as your dog’s source of fibre. By slowing down transit time, fibre helps to keep your dog feeling full for longer.

 

 

A diet high in fibre is also a great nutritional strategy for controlling your dog’s body weight. By keeping your dog a healthy body weight, you’re preventing her from getting diseases like diabetes. You’re also making sure that her joints stay healthy, so she can enjoy pain-free walks with you and her dog friends too.

 

Having a high-quality fibre source is very important to your dog’s gut health.

 

Have you heard of prebiotics?

 

Prebiotics are foods that are typically high in fibre that acts as food for the microflora in your gut.

 

 

Fibre can act as a prebiotic and increase the number of health-promoting microbiota in the gut, including lactobacilli and bifidobacteria.

 

There are other benefits to including brown rice in Norman’s Naturals as well.

Did you know that brown rice is a source of methionine and cysteine (amino acids important to your dog’s heart health?)

 

There’s another important reason for including healthy fibre in your dog’s diet. That’s right: high-quality fibre can reduce the incidence of diarrhea.

 

 

Whether your dog loves dashing through the snow, playing with friends at doggy daycare, or leaping through hoops at agility class, Norman’s Naturals will give them the energy they need to make every day their best day.

 


~Guest Contributor, Alyssa Foulkes

Alyssa is a local dog trainer based in Guelph, Ontario. 

 

Visit Norman's Naturals.com to order your bag today!
Subscription orders are now available!

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Ingredient #1 - Chicken Meal

CHICKEN MEAL: A High-Quality Protein for Your Dog 

 

  • 100% Chicken
  • Trustworthy and consistent source of protein
  • Not a by-product

Dogs need high-quality proteins to provide them with energy to run and play.

 

Chicken meal is an extremely rich protein. It is made of muscle meat.

 

Unlike chicken byproduct, chicken meal is made of 100% chicken meat. It is a trustworthy and consistent source of protein.

 

Chicken is also a source of methionine, cysteine, and taurine (amino acids important to your dog’s heart health.)

 

Did you know that dogs can convert the amino acids methionine and cysteine into taurine in their body?

 

It’s very important that your dog gets enough taurine in its diet because low levels of taurine in the blood can lead to heart issues like dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM.) 

 

 

Cases of DCM related to low levels of taurine in the blood have been reported in many different breeds, including Scottish Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Dalmatians, Boxers, Newfoundlands, Portuguese Water Dogs, English Setters, and Alaskan Malamutes. Providing these dogs with taurine improved their cardiac function.

 

Question: Which breeds are genetically predisposed to DCM?

 

Answer: Breeds with the highest prevalence of DCM include Dobermans, Boxers, Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, English Cocker Spaniels, and Portuguese Water Dogs.

 

By carefully selecting high-quality food for your best friend, you will reduce the risk of your dog developing DCM.

 

Question: What about flavour?

 

Answer: Our Chicken and Brown Rice blend tips the scale on flavour. Just ask Moose!

 

Moose is a Doberman Pinscher, who was an extremely picky eater. He turned his nose up at every kibble until he found Norman’s Naturals. Three years later, it’s still the only food he’ll eat! He needs energy for the long hikes he loves to take with his owner.

 

What’s your dog’s favourite activity? Leave a comment below!

 


~Guest Contributor, Alyssa Foulkes

Alyssa is a local dog trainer based in Guelph, Ontario. 

 

Visit Norman's Naturals.com to order your bag today!
Subscription orders are now available!

 

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A Well-Trained and Healthy Dog

 

Is your dog overweight because your last trainer told you to feed her hotdogs? You fed her as strangers approached, as dogs walked by, and every time you saw a squirrel. You fed her every time she sat, every time she lay down, and every time she barked out the window. Sometimes when you fed her, you thought, “Am I reinforcing her for barking out the window, though?”

 

 

Your gut instinct was right. Your dog learned that when she barks out the window, the next thing she should do is run to you and get a nice piece of hotdog. What an awesome game! 

 

Your veterinarian says that if your dog doesn’t lose weight, she’ll need knee surgery. She’s also at risk of getting diabetes.
 

How are you going to get your dog to listen to you without the hotdogs?  
 

One of my newer clients called me for help with her rescue dog. She’d been training with food, but quickly realized that when her dog is outside and fixated on another dog (or person) she could “wave a steak in front of his face and he wouldn’t notice.”  
 

Sound familiar?  

 

Here are some training tips to help you reach your goal of a friendly family dog who is nice to strangers, doesn’t pull on the leash, and is a healthy weight too:  
 

  1. WHAT DOES YOUR DOG LOVE? — Your dog loves YOU! She will likely work for your praise. You should use your voice to praise your dog. Be aware that dogs who are very high drive and excited already don’t need your “Good sit!” to have as much enthusiasm as if your child just got into the university of their choice. All dogs are snowflakes. Figure out whether a calmer tone helps your dog know she’s done a good job, or if you need a little more enthusiasm (because your dog is a little bit shy and requires more encouragement.)  
  2. TOUCH — Along with your voice, some dogs are very happy to work for being petted. We’ve all seen a police dog getting thumped on the rump for a job well done. That doesn’t mean YOUR pet dog enjoys that much enthusiasm and force. Some dogs like that and some dogs don’t. Your dog may be a little shy and likes a gentle chest rub. Bottom line, know YOUR dog. 
  3. TOYS — Your dog loves tug o’ war. Use this to your advantage. Your tug toy is now your dog’s reward. Ask them to heel, lay down, or sit and reward them with a bit of tug. Before using this method, teach your dog a reliable “drop it” command. 

PRO TIP: Dogs love to work for food and will often work for their food ration. Instead of using unhealthy, fattening hotdogs use their daily ration of Norman’s Naturals for training rewards.  
 

We hope you have lots of fun learning about what motivates YOUR dog. Drop a comment below and let us know what your dog loves to work for.  

 

~Alyssa Foulkes, MSc, Dog Behaviourist  
 

Alyssa loves helping dog lovers build better relationships with their dogs. Beyond Dog Training offers in-home, in-car, and online training in Guelph, ON and the surrounding area. 

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